Har Ki Dun Trek: A complete guide

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Har Ki Dun Trek: A complete guide The Garhwal Himalayas in Uttarakhand, India, contain the cradle-shaped hanging valley known as Har Ki Doon or Har Ki Dun. The area is encircled by lush Bugyals (High Altitude Meadows). Alpine greenery and snow-capped peaks surround it. The Borasu Pass connects it to Baspa Valley. This valley is covered in snow from October to March and is located approximately 3566 m (11700 ft) above mean sea level. lovers of the outdoors The Har-Ki-Doon valley, which is 3566 metres above sea level, is home to diverse alpine flora and flowers as well as dense jungles full with birds and other animals. South-east of the Jaundhar glacier lies a valley with a cradle-like shape called Har-Ki-Doon. It is encircled by snow-capped mountains, and to the southeast are dense forests. The forests are home to a variety of animals and are a true haven for birdwatchers and other nature enthusiasts. Best time to undertake the Har Ki Dun Trek: Kedarkantha is a journey that is accessible all year long. Yes, when it's covered with snow in January, you'll have the most beautiful vistas. In the months of March and April, Kedarkantha experiences an increase in temperature. A seasonal hike is called Har ki Doon. It receives a 5-foot snowfall in December, forcing authorities to seal its gates. The gates reopen to trekkers in March. The good weather makes camping and hiking a pleasure. Har ki Dun trek is one of the treks where you may discover a lot of snow in the months of March and April, but the snow on Kedarkantha fades away in March. Difficulty Grade The walk to Har ki Dun is a little more challenging than the one to Kedarkantha. Kedarkantha is a decent alternative for novices, although Har ki Dun is more suitable for intermediate hikers due to its moderate difficulty. Even beginners can undertake Har ki Dun with proper training and fitness, albeit it would be a challenging start for them. Quick Itinerary Dehradun to Sankri We leave early from Dehradun and go by car to Sankri. From numerous locations along the route from here, the summit of Kedarkantha can be observed. A few stores flank the centre market in this tiny community. Many apple orchards in the hamlet are harvested beginning in late July. On a clear day, one may see the Swargarohini peak from here. Sankri to Puani Garat Take a winding, mountainous forest route, crossing a few streams along the way. In about an hour, we arrived at Taluka, a tiny community with a few stores and two government guest rooms. From here, the hike begins along a gravel trail with the scent of cedar trees permeating Taluka. We stroll not far from the Supin River, which is raging with rapids. Puani Garat to Kalkatidhar We begin the day by ascending to the village of Osla, which is situated on a sloping spur about 100 metres above the Supin River. The first part of the trail to Osla is the steepest part of the entire walk and might take between 30 and 40 minutes to complete. Terraced farms are prevalent across the area surrounding Osla. The final village before reaching Har ki Dun is Osla. The river can be seen far below as the trail progressively ascends higher from Osla and passes through a few pastures. Some distance below the trail, to the right, we find a temple. We move through bushes filled with sunflowers, woolly flowers, and orchids. Main Har Ki Dun Peak As the journey begins, we soon come across a roaring waterfall that is hidden and close to a little tea store. Visit the junction of the rivers Supin and Ruinsara to see Black Peak and other snow-capped peaks in the Ruinsara valley. After ascending along the true right of the river, we reach the final section, which is inside a forest. Afterwards, the forest opens up to a stunning vista in Har ki Dun, which is situated at the confluence of two valleys, one coming from beyond Hata glacier and the other from Jaundhar glacier. After arriving at the destination, take some time to unwind and enjoy the surroundings before continuing the journey to Marinda Tal, which is 2-3 miles away. Kalkatidhar to Puani Garat We set out on the short, flat walk back to Osla. The valley descends into Taluka as we travel down the path, going around the bend in the hill where the two streams coming from Har Ki Dun and Ruinsara, respectively, converge. This gives us a good perspective of the trail leading to Osla. Once in Osla, visitors are free to wander the hamlet, engage in local conversation, and take in the Garhwali culture. Puani Garat to Sankri We leave this lovely place and begin our trip toward Taluka following the same trail that we used on the upwards trail. Trekking downhill causes the viewpoint to change substantially, making the views appear different. The walk is delightful and takes less time than before. Sankri to Dehradun It's still great to drive up to Mori through the distinct, less travelled areas. Even though the new hydro project has increased the risk to the area's sensitive environment, the section immediately following Mori town is still the most picturesque on the entire route. We arrive in Dehradun by late afternoon or early evening after passing through the towns and finally arriving in Kempty-Mussoorie. Mythology about the Trek This valley is thought to have sacred importance for Hindus and to have existed at the time of the Mahabharata. Locals claim that Yudhishthira, the Pandavas' eldest brother, scaled the Himalayan peak "Swargarohini" on his journey to heaven.

The Garhwal Himalayas in Uttarakhand, India, contains the cradle-shaped hanging valley known as Har Ki Doon or Har Ki Dun. The area is encircled by lush Bugyals (High Altitude Meadows). Alpine greenery and snow-capped peaks surround it. The Boras Pass connects it to Baspa Valley. This valley is covered in snow from October to March and is located approximately 3566 m (11700 ft) above mean sea level.

lovers of the outdoors The Har-Ki-Doon valley, which is 3566 meters above sea level, is home to diverse alpine flora and flowers as well as dense jungles full of birds and other animals. South-east of the Jalandhar glacier lies a valley with a cradle-like shape called Har-Ki-Doon. It is encircled by snow-capped mountains, and to the southeast are dense forests. The forests are home to a variety of animals and are a true haven for birdwatchers and other nature enthusiasts.

Best time to undertake the Har Ki Dun Trek:

Kedarkantha is a journey that is accessible all year long. Yes, when it’s covered with snow in January, you’ll have the most beautiful vistas. In the months of March and April, Kedarkantha experiences an increase in temperature. A seasonal hike is called Har ki Doon. It receives a 5-foot snowfall in December, forcing authorities to seal its gates. The gates reopen to trekkers in March. The good weather makes camping and hiking pleasure. Har ki Dun trek is one of the treks where you may discover a lot of snow in the months of March and April, but the snow on Kedarkantha fades away in March.

Difficulty Grade

The walk to Har ki Dun is a little more challenging than the one to Kedarkantha. Kedarkantha is a decent alternative for novices, although Har ki Dun is more suitable for intermediate hikers due to its moderate difficulty. Even beginners can undertake Har ki Dun with proper training and fitness, albeit it would be a challenging start for them.

Quick Itinerary

Dehradun to Sankri

We leave early from Dehradun and go by car to Sankri. From numerous locations along the route here, the summit of Kedarkantha can be observed. A few stores flank the center market in this tiny community. Many apple orchards in the hamlet are harvested beginning in late July. On a clear day, one may see the Swargarohini peak from here.

Sankri to Puani Garat

Take a winding, mountainous forest route, crossing a few streams along the way. In about an hour, we arrived at Taluka, a tiny community with a few stores and two government guest rooms. From here, the hike begins along a gravel trail with the scent of cedar trees permeating Taluka. We stroll not far from the Supin River, which is raging with rapids.

Puani Garat to Kalkatidhar

We begin the day by ascending the village of Osla, which is situated on a sloping spur about 100 meters above the Supin River. The first part of the trail to Osla is the steepest part of the entire walk and might take between 30 and 40 minutes to complete. Terraced farms are prevalent across the area surrounding Oslo. The final village before reaching Har ki Dun is Osla. The river can be seen far below as the trail progressively ascends higher from Osla and passes through a few pastures. Some distance below the trail, to the right, we find a temple. We move through bushes filled with sunflowers, woolly flowers, and orchids.

Main Har Ki Dun Peak

As the journey begins, we soon come across a roaring waterfall that is hidden and close to a little tea store. Visit the junction of the rivers Supin and Ruinsara to see Black Peak and other snow-capped peaks in the Ruinsara valley. After ascending along the true right of the river, we reach the final section, which is inside a forest. Afterward, the forest opens up to a stunning vista in Har ki Dun, which is situated at the confluence of two valleys, one coming from beyond the Hata glacier and the other from the Jaundhar glacier. After arriving at the destination, take some time to unwind and enjoy the surroundings before continuing the journey to Marinda Tal, which is 2-3 miles away.

Kalkatidhar to Puani Garat

We set out on the short, flat walk back to Osla. The valley descends into Taluka as we travel down the path, going around the bend in the hill where the two streams coming from Har Ki Dun and Ruinsara, respectively, converge. This gives us a good perspective of the trail leading to Osla. Once in Osla, visitors are free to wander the hamlet, engage in local conversation, and take in the Garhwali culture.

Puani Garat to Sankri

We leave this lovely place and begin our trip toward Taluka following the same trail that we used on the upwards trail. Trekking downhill causes the view to change substantially, making the views appear different. The walk is delightful and takes less time than before.

Sankri to Dehradun

It’s still great to drive up to Mori through the distinct, less traveled areas. Even though the new hydro project has increased the risk to the area’s sensitive environment, the section immediately following Mori town is still the most picturesque on the entire route. We arrive in Dehradun by late afternoon or early evening after passing through the towns and finally arriving in Kempty-Mussoorie.

Mythology about the Trek

This valley is thought to have sacred importance for Hindus and to have existed at the time of the Mahabharata. Locals claim that Yudhishthira, the Pandavas’ eldest brother, scaled the Himalayan peak “Swargarohini” on his journey to heaven.